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How Much Room Do You Need for a Restaurant Bar?

How do you size a restaurant bar



Discover the secrets of how to calculate the area you’ll need if you’re planning a restaurant bar design.

HOW MUCH ROOM DO YOU NEED FOR A RESTAURANT BAR?

The following is the interpretation and opinion of Rick Uzubell and covers overlapping requirements of building codes, standards and regulations and is only a general guideline. Consult your local architect for exact information.

When you look at prospective commercial buildings, do they appear abstract? If you’re in the market for a restaurant/bar and don’t know how to select a prospective building to match a given occupancy, you’ve come to the right place! From a previous video, let’s again use this 4,700 sq.ft. restaurant/sports bar, which we determined to have an occupancy load of 157, as calculated by the guidelines stipulated in the International Building Code (known as IBC). As mentioned before, this is only a general guideline for planning, because the local fire marshal makes the final determination of stated occupancies. Although IBC introduced revisions in 2018 for fire areas in excess of 1,500 sq.ft. for A-2 businesses serving alcohol, the method of computing occupant loads stated herein is still current.

When planning buildings for prospective restaurant/bars, the fact most hospitality experts agree on is that the back-of-the-house generally accounts for 30 – 40% of the total building area. This means that 60 – 70% of a given building’s space is designated as front-of-the-house, which is the area intended for customers. The 10% variance is normally the result of the complexity of the menu. Sports bars tend to require less kitchen space, whereas fine dining requires more. Also note in this example that the bar and bar dining areas account for nearly 43% of the front-of-the-house area as well as 60% of the total occupant load. Conversely, the non-bar dining accounts for 27% of the front-of-the-house area and 40% of the occupant load. The remaining front-of-the-house space (30%) is dedicated to common areas, as shown in the following tables:

Table 1

Front-Of-The-House Occupancy Analysis

 

Room

Area

% of Total

Bar Area

·         Bar (seated)

29

18.5

·         Bar Dining

65

41.4

Sub-Total

94

59.9

Non-Bar Areas

·         Reception

06

3.8

·         Dining Room

45

28.7

·         VIP Room

12

7.6

Sub-Total

63

40.1

Total

157

100.0

Table 2

Front-Of-The-House Area Analysis

 

Room

Area

% of Total

Bar Dining

·         Bar (seated)

410

12.7

·         Bar (tables)

983

30.4

Sub-Total

1,393

43.1

Non-Bar Dining

·         Dining Room

681

21.0

·         VIP Room

183

5.7

Sub-Total

864

26.7

Common Areas

·         Reception

106

3.3

·         Men’s Restroom

140

4.3

·         Women’s Restroom

146

4.5

·         Hallways

423

13.1

·         Vestibule

164

5.0

Sub-Total

979

30.2

Total

3,236

100.0


 

 

What if you’re planning a new restaurant/bar with an occupancy load of 100 – how large would your building need to be? The above information will serve as a good template for establishing an approximate building size, but given the variation of kitchen sizes, let’s first focus on how the front-of-the-house space can be predicted. If the above 3,236 sq.ft. front-of-the-house space yields an occupancy of 157, we could predict that an occupancy of 100 would require approximately 2,061 sq.ft. for the front-of-the-house according to the following calculations: 

  • 3,236 sq.ft./157 occupants = 20.6 sq.ft./occupant

  • 100 occupants x 20.6 sq.ft./occupant – 2,060 sq.ft.

The overall size of the facility, with 30% of the overall space dedicated to the back-of-the-house can be calculated as follows:

  • 2,060 sq.ft./.7 = 2,944 sq.ft.

The back-of-the-house requirements can be calculated as follows: 

  • 2,944 sq.ft. – 2,060 sq.ft. = 884 sq.ft. 

So, in round numbers, a 3,000 sq.ft. restaurant/bar would be broken down into 900 sq.ft. for back-of-the-house and 2,100 sq.ft. for front-of-the-house. 

The next decision will be the breakdown of the dining seating. In our example, about 1/3 of the overall occupancy is dedicated to dining seating and 2/3 to the bar area. This model is built on the success of the bar and that makes a lot of sense, because the activity of the dining patrons tends to taper-off several hours before closing. Secondly, the dining room is more family-friendly and therefore we want to earmark enough capacity. A restaurant/bar with an occupancy of 100 should probably have 40% of its capacity dedicated to dining tables; ten booths would be a solid approach. The remaining 60 patrons could be split between the island bar and adjacent 4-top tables and booths.

The building code is constantly evolving. According to my good friend, architect Tom Kuhn of CSK Architects, as of 2018, IBC now requires businesses in Occupancy A-2 that serve alcohol, any new or existing modified fire area over 1500 sq.ft. would be required to have sprinklers if you wanted to meet current code without implementing work-around design parameters in Chapter 34. Always consult your local architect.

I want to thank our good friends at Bullpen Luxury Sports Bar and Gelsosomo’s Pizza for their courtesy. A great place to hang-out, have pizza and watch the game.

TODAY’S TAKEAWAY:

Restaurants with bars don’t require large waiting areas, as many patrons enjoy waiting at the bar.

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POPULAR DOWNLOADS:

STANDARD BAR CLEARANCES w/ADA:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/6pnjarjnonq0d7t/UNIVERSAL%20BAR%20CLEARANCES%20w_ADA.pdf?dl=0

ADA GUIDE FOR SMALL BUSINESSES:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/a5rldodql5fjq4s/ADA%20GUIDE%20FOR%20SMALL%20BUSINESSES.pdf?dl=0

BAR AND RESTAURANT SEATING GUIDELINES:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/lwni53dohpc4hbd/BAR%20AND%20RESTAURANT%20SEATING%20GUIDELINES.jpg?dl=0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2

Front-Of-The-House Area Analysis

 

                     

Room

Area

% of Total

Bar Dining

·         Bar (seated)

410

12.7

·         Bar (tables)

983

30.4

Sub-Total

1,393

43.1

Non-Bar Dining

·         Dining Room

681

21.0

·         VIP Room

183

5.7

Sub-Total

864

26.7

Common Areas

·         Reception

106

3.3

·         Men’s Restroom

140

4.3

·         Women’s Restroom

146

4.5

·         Hallways

423

13.1

·         Vestibule

164

5.0

Sub-Total

979

30.2

Total

3,236

100.0

How to Calculate Maximum Occupancy for a Bar
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